Eternal ponder

On a centre stage I connected. Blessed, and in the presence of a greater strength, words flowed about my family, climate change and agriculture. I look back at my family's history and find hope. Hope for a better future. Hope for change.

Science and ancient knowledge

I'm writing a bit under the weather today, dragged down by the flu but fighting on as best I can. It's been good to catch up on some sleep, spend some time at home and just clear the mind a little. All with time to recover and gear up for the next financial year.

It starts with connection

By the waters edge, a story swirls and seems to play out as it is told. The story written in the landscape proves the legitimacy of each word, confirming the time some 7,000 years ago. When the sea's shore was over 120 kilometres from where it is now, it's obvious this changing climate of ours is now speeding up.

More than miles

Old books filled familiar places to inspire future thinking. Filled with the thinking of the time, an old Farmer's Weekly provided advice to fix anything, while the old show results of another show provided hope for progression of breeds often ignored now. History stored for another day, wondering when it will be acknowledged and learnt from.

The picture on the wall.

On a distant fridge, a picture hangs with a single clydesdale. It's what dreams are made of, reflecting the perfect horse of the judge over the weekend's proceedings. His eye casts over the 60 odd horses on display, filtered by that distant view, as he selects his favourite.

Meaningful Lyricism

Cattle bids made the auctioneer sing of prices not so bad, as he danced with an old rogue steer around the pen. The silent manoeuvre renders the crowd quiet, as the Boorowa lad lets out a familiar call, mirroring his late Dad. As the murmuring heartbeat starts again, the bustle continues on- this pen makes way for the next, the bidding starts again.

Heavy Horses and Merino Memories

Counting time on through events, reminds me of the ticking stopwatch used to count grain. The contrast of hard hands to tie off fence wire, yet soft enough to cradle lambs and handle sheep. Although 12 months has passed, it's hard not to still feel your presence. A cracking season, healthy lambs and wool amassing faster than the period before. Still caretaking, still managing the landscape. The Quiet Stockman.

Running.

This week started with some rain soaked fencing with Nan, working down on the other block to build a holding pen. It was then to Canberra for a road trip on Saturday before feeding sheep on Sunday.

12 months on.

A stiller Autumn night pauses the street, as crickets chirping to nature's heartbeat is met by a subtle acoustic country track playing. A year has passed since the first blog, as new memories become stored to make our house a home. So, what have I learnt?

Homestead dreams

This week has naturally focused on Polly, who has slowly started blending into everyday life around here. At times, her instinct has had her rounding up sheep in the backyard and at others calming her puppy ways to connect with a child. Then come the puppy terrors and the occasional need for affection.

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